Why I make photographs the way I do

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Of course, I make photographs because, well, I like making photographs. Forgive me if this seems somewhat circular, but it's difficult to distance oneself from a practice that has been so ingrained for so many years, becoming an unconscious reflex. These days, that reflex is to grab my phone when I'm in a situation where it feels like an interesting image may be about to present itself. I'm trying to train myself out of that more recent reflex development, by providing an alternative pathway to an actual camera I try to have at hand. 

But it is an interesting exercise to try to understand the path of my life's experience and training, and how that might influence how I see the world, and how I frame images and my use of light when I make photographs. For example, the range of expressions it looks like I habitually capture when I look through my back catalogue. The absences of people or emotions which feel somehow too difficult in one way or another to commit to a photographic process. It is an evolving way of seeing my photographic practice, but here's where I have arrived at most recently, in as succinct a way as possible:

I use photography as a means of exploring the relationship between people, place, and behaviour. Drawing on my 25 years or experience as a psychologist helps me to frame my images and the people and place that I photograph. Often, I won’t know what has drawn me to make a photograph of a particular image. And more often than not, I discover something else as I process and actually physically print out that photo too. Photography helps me to explore the hidden understandings of my character, the knowledge I bring, and the world I live in and how they all come together in the creation of a photograph.