Photowalking in Wellington

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Getting to know a new city if you're there on holiday or staying for a while can be an overwhelming experience. There's so much to do and see - where do you start? Guided tours are one way of getting underneath the hood of a city, but another way is getting to know a local. But how can you do that? I found a group on Reddit (r/Wellington) that leads photowalks around the city who welcome anyone to join in. As a long-time resident of the city, I know it quite well, but it's always good to take a fresh perspective, so I thought I'd grab my camera and go along. Pukeahu War Memorial Park is a wide open space and a perfect place to pick for the start of a photowalk. Twenty people managed to find each other to start a 2-3 hours of walking, talking and making photographs. It was an inclusive event - any camera was fine -  and it soon became clear to me that a few people were more there for the walk than the making of photographs, so that made for a diverse group to be with. 

I set myself a few tasks for a photography workout. To use some of the colour filters that are a feature of my Fujifilm X-T1 (with the 18-55mm XF kit lens for the afternoon), to try some double exposures, and to continue practicing using spot metering for exposure. Here are some of the pictures I made that the afternoon. 

First, from Pukeahu War Memorial to Central Park in Brooklyn.

We moved on after checking in that we were all still together and on track.

Finally, we headed into the city via Te Aro.

At the end of the walk, we stopped off at Photoflux - New Zealand's first Sci-Fi bar, with a strong dash of cameras and photography as a theme too - lots of Minolta and old 110 film cameras on display in the bar itself. One of the most interesting things about the afternoon was a print swap at the end of the session in the pub. Those people who had brought prints along to exchange put them all in one envelope and took turns to draw another one out. This led to some really fascinating conversations about the photos, who took them, what they were doing when they took the photo and about the content of the photo too. The street portrait that I took out of the envelope was taken in Indonesia at the end of a 5-hour conversation, and I also heard about making a photograph of a monkey in the Bantu caves in Malaysia. Certainly a well-traveled and diverse, friendly group, and a great way to spend a Saturday afternoon, making photographs and sharing some tales over a beer with actual physical prints.

I wandered home back to the car, taking a few more photographs to round off the afternoon.