Podcasts posts

WCWTP Challenge: Join me as my guest as Speaking with Purpose in Wellington on 27 March 2017

Welcome to this bonus challenge show. Want to learn how to storytell? Join me as guest of the Who cares? What’s the point? podcast at the amazing Speaking with Purpose event on 27 March ($500+ value). Listen to this short show and check out the flyer attached to find out how.  Complete three steps in this challenge:   Follow @wcwtp […]

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WCWTPs2e2: What do we know about the “nocebo effect” and how it works?

Welcome to Season 2, Episode 2 of the show. Who cares? What’s the point? The podcast about the mind for people who think. If you’re a regular listener – welcome back.If you’re new to the show, welcome to you too. Please check out the shows in Season 1 – I hope you’ll find some interesting […]

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WCWTPs2e1 Is human language underpinned by how we came to use gestures to communicate?

Welcome to Season 2, Episode 1 of the show. Who cares? What’s the point? The podcast about the mind for people who think. If you’re a regular listener – welcome back. We have some great shows lined up. If you’re new to the show, welcome to you too. Please check out the shows in Season […]

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Have you heard? Season 1 was awesome. Can you help with Season 2?

Hi and welcome to Who Cares? What’s the point? Season 1 is in the bag – and here’s the run down of the shows I have broadcast so far:  Dr Matt Williams, New Zealand – What influence could climate change have on human aggression? A/Prof Claire Vallotton, USA – Father’s parenting stress and toddler language development Prof […]

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WCWTPs1e10 Is there a link between dehydration and our experience of pain?

Welcome to Season 1, Episode 10 of the show. Who cares? What’s the point? The podcast about the mind for people who think. In this episode, I talk with Dt Toby Mundel of the School of Sport and Exercise Science at Massey University in New Zealand. We talk about his recent work investigating the relationship between people’s […]

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WCWTPs1e9 Does turning the clocks back for winter-time lead to a higher rate of depression?

Welcome to Season 1, Episode 9 of the show. Who cares? What’s the point? The podcast about the mind for people who think. In this episode, I talk with Dr Bertel Teilfeldt Hansen of the Department of Political Science at Copenhagen University in Denmark. We talk about his involvement in this project looking at the impact of clock changes in […]

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WCWTPs1e8 What do we know about how food is used to foster social relationships for young women at school?

Welcome to Season 1, Episode 8 of the show. Who cares? What’s the point? The podcast about the mind for people who think. In this episode, I talk with Dr Eva Neely, Lecturer at the School of Public Health at Massey University, here in Wellington, New Zealand. The abstract to her paper can be found […]

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WCWTPs1e7 How to tell the difference between fact and fiction on a ‘post-truth’ internet

Welcome to Season 1, Episode 7 of the show. Who cares? What’s the point? The podcast about the mind for people who think. In this episode, I talk with Professor Sam Wineburg at the Graduate School of Education at Stanford University in the USA.   We talk about his involvement a project looking at how people […]

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WCWTPs1e6 Mapping the link between biodiversity and our wellbeing

Welcome to Season 1, Episode 6 of the show. Who cares? What’s the point? The podcast about the mind for people who think. In this episode, I talk with Laurie Parma of The Department of Psychology at the University of Cambridge in the UK. We talk about her involvement in development if the NatureBuzz app – […]

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WCWTPs1e5 What do we know about sleep paralysis?

Welcome to Season 1, Episode 5 of the show. Who cares? What’s the point? The podcast about the mind for people who think. In this episode, I talk with Associate Professor Brian Sharpless of the American School of Professional Psychology, Argosy University, Washington DC, USA. We talk about his recent work understanding and developing treatment recommendations for […]

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