The Psychology Report posts

Who cares? What’s the point? 2016-17 – Building a science communication podcast

I have been hosting and producing Who cares? What’s the point? – my science communication podcast – for a year now. There was an opportunity to talk about my creative journey over this year at the Science Communicators of New Zealand annual conference last week, so I took it up and gave a short presentation […]

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Speech to the Fabian Society: Key elements for a Reformed Mental Health System in Aotearoa

This is the text from the speech I gave to the Fabian Society in Auckland on the evening of 6 December, 2017. I have made the speech text available for viewing here via Google Docs, but have also reproduced it below with the slides I also presented that evening. I believe that the organisers made […]

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What do we know about how young women think about food at school?

In this episode I talk to Dr. Eva Neely, a lecturer at the School of Public Health at Massey University in Wellington, New Zealand. She has done some groundbreaking research on the social health meanings of food for youth in schools – which is a step away from the usual health-focused approach used when trying […]

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Five ideas for reforming mental health care in New Zealand

The first article in this short series looked at the scale and scope of the problem of increasing mental health related presentations in New Zealand. In that first article, I argued that ‘Capitalism with a Human Face’ can take its place in altering the settings of the economy in favour of the experience of those […]

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How ‘Capitalism with a human face’ can influence mental health reform

This is an exciting time: a new Labour – NZ First Government, with support from the Green Party, with new leadership focused on how “capitalism must regain its human face”. This people and environment-centred Government will also rightly be focused on addressing the mental health problems and misery experienced by many in New Zealand, and […]

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How to tell the difference between fact and fiction on a ‘post-truth’ internet

“Right now we have a health hazard to democratic functioning.” Those are the words of Professor Sam Wineberg of the Graduate School of Education at Stanford University in the United States, my guest on this edition of The Psychology Report. Professor Weinberg and his colleagues have been looking at the sorts of errors that we […]

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Mapping the link between biodiversity and wellbeing – NatureBuzz

Sarb Johal:       In this week’s Psychology Report I talked with Laurie Parma from the Department of Psychology at the University of Cambridge in England, about Nature Buzz (iTunes / Android)- the new research application they have developed to explore the links between nature and well-being. Have a read of this conversation to understand more about […]

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Sleep paralysis – more common than you might think

In this week’s Psychology Report, I talked with Associate Professor Dr Brian Sharpless of the American School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University, Northern Virginia, USA. Brian is interested in unusual disorders, and for this show, we are talking about sleep paralysis. Brian has been interested in the phenomenon of sleep paralysis for some time and […]

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How do emojis change our communication?

In this Psychology Report, I talked with Dr Michael Philipp of Massey University School of Psychology here in New Zealand. Michael and his students are interested in how emoji and emoticons are used in computer based communication – so, those emails tweets and Facebook posts – that kind of thing. I start by asking Michael […]

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What creeps us out?

SJ:       In this Psychology Report, I talk with Professor Frank McAndrew at Knox College in Illinois, USA, and we get into the concept of creepy and how he studied it in this paper. Now, creepy is a phrase you may have been hearing a lot more over the last two or three years, and often […]

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